Remote Sensing text books

I have been looking for a new text book, or text books, for an undergraduate and a masters course in remote sensing. At the masters level we have used Paul Mather’s Computer Processing of Remotely Sensed Images (Wiley). Mather’s book is a comprehensive introduction to image processing and is accessible, explaining difficult concepts such as PCA in a way students with non-numerical backgrounds can grasp. I suspect Prof. Mather has a gift for teaching. However, the course has changed and image processing is being de-emphasised. At the undergraduate level Lillesand and Kiefer and Campbell have been used, but don’t entirely satisfy. Personally, I like Gareth Rees Physical Prinicples of Remote Sensing, but that doesn’t fit the course profile.

Today, Oxford University Press delivered a new book:

Jones, H.G. and Vaughan, R.A. (2010) Remote Sensing of Vegetation: principles, techniques and applications. In the Preface the authors explain their motivation to write the book: ” many of the current texts do not appear adequately to reflect the increasing interest in the remote sensing (RS) of vegetation and the rapid development of new tools..”. I couldn’t agree more.

My first impression is that Jones & Vaughan have written a quite spectacular book. The physical principles seem to be covered in a level of detail I have not seen before, but without introducing a complexity that will befuddle non-physicists. Plant anatomy has its’ own chapter (!); great for us ecologically-challenged.

I’ll return  with a fuller review here at a later date: now I am looking forward to delving into the book. This hasn’t happened with a text book before. Watch this space.

Find the book here:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Remote-Sensing-Vegetation-Principles-Applications/dp/0199207798/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1296721800&sr=1-1

[for the sake of disclosure: Robin Vaughan was one of my Ph.D supervisors].

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This entry was posted in Misc. Information, Remote Sensing, Teaching and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

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